PARKLAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

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"The new hospital will be a safe, welcoming, patient-centered healing environment that serves as a sustainable community resource for Dallas County. It will promote excellence in clinical care, teaching, and research in a technologically advanced, easily accessible environment."


The New Parkland Hospital showcases many of the best practices supported by Evidence Based Design. The following Evidence-Based Design features have been incorporated into the project:

  • Single patient rooms
  • Acuity-adaptable patient rooms
  • Strategically placed hand hygiene facilities
  • Decentralized nursing stations in combination with decentralized nurse servers
  • On-stage/off-stage circulation
  • Noise reduction measures
  • Increased patient access to natural light
  • Access to nature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THE ROLE

  • Served as an Interior Design Project Manager for the New Parkland Hospital project from November 2009 through 2017.
     
  • Served as a key client relationship-holder and point-person in executive summaries and pivotal Interior Design presentation to the Board of Managers.
     
  • Leveraged communication skills to build consensus and facilitate communication in a challenging design environment.
     
  • Continuing to lead multiple wayfinding focused research studies in conjunction with the Center for Health Design Parkland Pebble Project.
     
  • Multiple speaking engagements.

TRANSFORMED CARE IN DALLAS COUNTY:

THE PATIENT ROOM

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One example of the impact the design can have on the delivery of care is the layout of patient room.

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Old Parkland patient room (140 sf, dual occupancy) shown in pink overlaid onto new Parkland patient room (260 sf, single occupancy).  In a single occupancy room, patients are more likely to rest more soundly and communicate more honestly with their caregivers.

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New Patient room zones allow for more efficient use of space – especially allowing family to engage in complementary care while patient is in hospital.  This reduces re-admissions because the family knows how to assist with care at home.

THE mock-up

AKA. HOW NOT TO MAKE THE SAME MISTAKE 1,000 TIMES.

 
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BENEFITS

Nurse liaisons facilitated tours and mock scenarios (code, deliveries, etc)

Community involvement

Clinician involvement

All comments tracked and addressed – All eyes have equal value

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MAINTENANCE + DURABILITY

Floor Maintenance
Wall Protection

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TESTING GROUND

Innovation
Constructability
Function

RESEARCH RESULTS

TECHNOLOGY + WAYFINDING

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When the design of the new Parkland hospital began, the iPad had not yet been introduced to the marketplace.  In this context, as we began to research wayfinding strategies for the new Parkland facility, including plans for technology-based wayfinding tools, the team began the wayfinding research with a survey of the technology use of the current population at Parkland.

What we discovered was that 35% of the current Parkland population did not currently use cellphones and 37% did not use computers of any kind.  This knowledge helped the team focus wayfinding technology in the right direction and develop wayfinding kiosk software appropriate for the Parkland community user group.

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RESEARCH RESULTS

PRE-OCCUPANCY PERCEPTION OF DIFFICULTY

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The team conducted a pre-occupancy wayfinding study to compare the perception of wayfinding difficulty between the existing Parkland hospital, which was in use, and the completed, but unoccupied, new Parkland hospital building. 

To create a similar experience between the two buildings, the study subjects were given a scripted wayfinding task in each building of similar length and complexity.  The subjects also wore eye-tracking glasses so that the team could evaluate which landmarks along the routes were the most viewed. 

Each subject was given the scripted directions to follow and asked to estimate the difficulty of the task.  After they arrived at the destination, they were asked to assess the actual difficulty of the task. 

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After computing the results, the team noted that, although the new facility was twice as large as the old facility, more subjects found the task “very easy” in the new facility.  The team looks forward to repeating the study in the occupied new facility.



MORE CASE STUDIES

 

LET'S GET THE CONVERSATION STARTED.

 
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